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General Mills estimates that for every one mile per hour reduction in average speeds of its trucking shipments below the posted speed limits adds $2 million in higher annual costs.
By failing to invest in our vital transportation systems by 2020, businesses would pay an extra $430 billion in transportation costs, household incomes would fall by $7,000 and U.S. exports would fall by $28 billion.
According to UPS, if congestion causes each UPS delivery driver to incur 5 minutes of delay it would cost the company $100 million.
In Chicago, the nation’s biggest rail center, congestion is so bad that it takes a freight train longer to get through the city limits than it does to get to Los Angeles.
The on-site costs of mining metallurgical coal in North America may be the same as in Australia.  But the cost of shipping it to the coasts to export it to Asia is up to 4 times greater due to transportation and logistical costs.
Only three U.S. ports (Norfolk, Baltimore and Miami) are dredged deep enough to accommodate the post-Panamax ships that will become the norm when the newly widened Panama Canal opens.
Vehicle travel on America’s highways increased by 15 percent from 2000 to 2015.  U.S. vehicle travel during the first 8 months of 2016 increased 3.1 percent from the same period in 2015.
In some urban areas driving on roads in need of repair can cost the average driver $523 per year.
Nearly one-third of the nation's major urban roads are in poor or mediocre condition.  Driving on roads in need of repair costs U.S. motorists $112 billion a year in extra vehicle repairs and operating costs or $523 per motorist.
The total cost of congestion in 2014 was $160 billion or $960 in wasted time and fuel for every traveler.  Americans wasted 42 hours sitting in congestion in 2014.   This is up from 16 hours in 1982.
In 2013, six of the nation’s 30 largest airports were already experiencing congestion levels equal to the Wednesday before Thanksgiving one day per the average week.  In 2014, the number of airports already at that congestion level has more than doubled to 13.
U.S. air traffic congestion has steadily increased over the last decade, with record levels of delays at our busiest airports.  The U.S. now has the world’s worst air traffic congestion: more than 1 in 5 flights departing our busiest airports are delayed, and 48% of delays in our 5 largest metropolitan areas are caused by our outdated aviation system. This problem will get worse in the future, as air travel is projected to double or even triple by 2025.